Tuesday, 3 February 2009

Interim Assessment of Collaborative Working Practice

Overview

As well as looking at the information by collaborative working theme there are some interesting differences when the feedback is analysed by stakeholder group.

The aggregate scores attributed to the statements by colleagues working in the Private Sector (mainly consultancy) were approximately 15% higher than those attributed by Public Sector FAN Club members. Differences varied across the collaborative working themes; from 7% for Collaborative Behaviours to 24% for Relationship Development.

Despite these differences in the Collaboration Health Check aggregate scores, the profile outlines are similar for both sectors although the range of scores within theme is generally wider in the Public Sector feedback compared to the Private Sector.

Public Sector

Public Sector respondents gave their highest rating to Engagement and Relationship Development, based on their own collaborative working experience. Collaborative Working Process attracted the lowest rating, potentially indicating a capability development need.


n=10

Note: The numbers on the vertical axis refer to the statement number from the Collaboration Health Check (see below for a list of the statements in numerical order) and the colour coding indicates the level of agreement or disagreement respondents have shared in their feedback. Green / light green indicates strength of agreement, amber is neutral and red / pink indicates disagreement.

Private Sector

Private Sector respondents gave their highest rating to Relationship Development, based on their own collaborative working experience.

Like the Public Sector FAN Club members, Collaborative Working Process attracted the lowest rating albeit at 9% above the aggregate rating given by their Public Sector colleagues. Also like their Public Sector colleagues, the Private Sector feedback showed collaborative Behaviours ranked second lowest, perhaps suggesting there may be some common capability development needs.


n=5

Note: The numbers on the vertical axis refer to the statement number from the Collaboration health Check (see below for a list of the statements in numerical order) and the colour coding indicates the level of agreement or disagreement respondents have shared in their feedback. Green / light green indicates strength of agreement, amber is neutral and red / pink indicates disagreement.

Collaboration Health Check statements

The Collaboration Health Check asked respondents to indicate their level of agreement with 35 statements by entering: 0 - don't know / not applicable; 1 - disagree strongly; 2 - disagree; 3 - neither agree or disagree ; 4 - agree; or 5 - strongly agree.

[1] We are clear about the assumptions we hold and the facts we know about our potential partner(s).
[2] We regularly share the assumptions we hold about our partner(s), with our partner(s).
[3] We are clear about the value to us of forming relationships with other stakeholders.
[4] We tend to have a good existing relationship with our stakeholders before we collaborate on a particular initiative.
[5] When collaborating, we engage with our partner(s) at an early stage to ensure we incorporate their thoughts and ideas.
[6] In the early stages of engaging with potential partners, we share our "wants and offers" with them.
[7] We start a collaborative working initiative by paying particular attention to our relationship with our partner(s).
[8] When working with our partner(s) we are genuinely open to adopting ideas expressed by them.
[9] We are prepared to "give something up" in order to progress an opportunity to collaborate.
[10] When agreeing the activities and resourcing for a collaborative project, we also explicitly address "how" we will work together.
[11] When working collaboratively, we co-create the design of the initiative with our partner(s).
[12] When we collaborate we are clear about the level of investment required from our partner(s).
[13] When we collaborate we are clear about the level of investment we are required to make.
[14] When we collaborate we are clear about the benefit(s) that will accrue to our shared stakeholers as well as to our own stakeholders.
[15] When we collaborate, we are clear about the potential benefit(s) that will accrue to our partner(s).
[16] When we collaborate, we are clear about the potential benefit(s) that will accrue to us.
[17] We and our partners are jointly accountable for project governance.
[18] When we are working with our partner(s) it "feels" like an equitable relationship.
[19] We acknowledge and value "difference" as a source of creativity and innovation when working with other stakeholders.
[20] During collaborative work, we take collective responsibility - with our partner(s) - for maintaining our focus on achieving our mutually agreed goals.
[21] We always seek to review and where necessary revise our contract with our partner(s) during our collaboration.
[22] When we work collaboratively, we create new possibilities that would not have been created by working alone.
[23] We value and embrace the challenge presented by seeking an external stakeholder's input to and perspective on our work.
[24] Our relationship with our partner(s) continues to develop as we work together.
[25] We regularly share the insights gained from our own work with other interested stakeholders.
[26] We regularly engage colleagues from different departments in our own organisation to gain their perspective on our collaborative work.
[27] Colleagues across our organisation understand the value and challenges presented by working collaboratively.
[28] Avenues of communication are always open with our partner(s) ensuring we resolve issues that arise effectively and efficiently, while we collaborate.
[29] We always review the collaboration's performance against mutually agreed objectives.
[30] We formally close off a collaborative initiative with the full agreement of our partner(s).
[31] We are open to honest feedback from our partner(s).
[32] We are honest with our partners(s) in giving feedback.
[33] When we review a collaboration we seek to learn from the experience, rather than attributing blame for things that went wrong.
[34] In reviewing our experience of a collaborative initiative, we explore the possibility of future collaboration with our partner(s).
[35] Our relationships tend to be better with our partner(s) when we have collaborated on an initiative than they were before.

Full detail will be available in the final report (to be made available in time for the May FAN Club meeting) but if you have any questions in the meantime, please email me.